Toxin Profiles

Substance Name

Cobalt sulfate
Identification Number: CASRN | 10124-43-3

  Nastiness Attributes


  • Known Human Carcinogen

    This is a serious nasty substance. Exposure to this substance leads to cancer in Humans. Exercise extreme caution with this substance, explore your exposure routes and very seriously consider complete avoidance. See further details under Toxins.

  • Carcinogenic Properties

    Accumulating evidence points to cancer potential. Exercise caution with this substance, explore your exposure routes and consider complete avoidance. See further details under Toxins.

  • Birth/Developmental

    Known to effect development of fetus.

  • Metabolic Interference or Disruption

    Interferes with human metabolism. This can be a very serious thing. Some of these interference mechanics are well established. However, often long term effects and health consequences remain largely unknown. Additionally an emerging area of concern and one that is not currently studied, is the combined synergistic effects these metabolically disrupting chemicals have on human health.

    Metabolic interference happens when the substance produces highly reactive and often damaging intermediates during detoxification or when the substance binds to specific enzymes, important structural groups on molecules, receptors and membranes or targets DNA or mimics key nutrients.

  • Exposure Produces Health Symptoms

    Symptoms maybe short term or long term depending on the exposure duration and intensity and effects areas like Cardiovascular, Gastrointestinal, Cognition, Fatigue. A substance with this attribute may cause an allergic skin reaction, serious eye irritation, allergy or asthma symptoms or breathing difficulties if inhaled.

  • Toxic to Wildlife

    May kill plants, fish, birds or other animals and insects or may be very toxic to aquatic life with long lasting effects. This then effects delicate environmental ecology and food supply in ways we don't fully understand yet.


  • CATEGORIES: Industrial/Workplace Toxin | Pollutant | Airborne Pollutant | Food Toxin | Synthetic Toxin | EAFUS (Everything Added to Food in the United States) | Inert Pesticide Ingredient USA - Non Food Use Only | A Hazardous Substance that may be found in the Australian Workplace
  • SUBSTANCE LINEAGE: Inorganic Compounds | Mixed Metal/Non-metal Compounds | Transition Metal Oxoanionic Compounds | Transition Metal Sulfates | Transition Metal Sulfates
  • SYNONYMS: Cobalt (2+) sulfate | Cobalt (2+) sulphate | Cobalt brown | Cobalt monosulfate | Cobalt monosulphate | Cobalt sulfate (1:1) | Cobalt sulfate (CoSO4) | Cobalt sulfate | heptahydrate | Cobalt sulfic acid | Cobalt sulphate | Cobalt sulphate (1:1) | Cobalt sulphate (CoSO4) | Cobalt sulphate | heptahydrate | Cobalt sulphic acid | Cobalt(2+) sulfate | Cobalt(2+) sulphate | Cobalt(II) sulfate | Cobalt(II) sulphate | Cobaltous sulfate | Cobaltous sulfate salt (1:1) | Cobaltous sulphate | Cobaltous sulphate salt (1:1) | CoSO4 | Sulfuric acid | cobalt(2+) salt (1:1)
  • DESCRIPTION: Cobalt sulfate is found in alcoholic beverages. Once used in fermented malt beverages as a foam stabiliser; now prohibited from use in food
    Cobalt sulfate belongs to the family of Transition Metal Sulfates. These are inorganic compounds in which the largest oxoanion is sulfate, and in which the heaviest atom not in an oxoanion is a transition metal.
  • COMMENTS: From Safe Work Australia and the Hazardous Substances Information System (HSIS) in Australia: May cause cancer. Suspected of causing genetic defects. May damage fertility. Harmful if swallowed. May cause allergy or asthma symptoms or breathing difficulties if inhaled. May cause an allergic skin reaction. Very toxic to aquatic life with long lasting effects | Chronic Health Hazard Environmental Hazard General Health Hazard | A Hazardous Substance that may be found in the Australian Workplace. Check with your employer or health and safety officer. Stay informed and become aware of the dangers that surround you. This chemical is included on the list of recognised hazardous chemicals from the Safe Work Australia - Hazardous Substances Information System (HSIS) that is based on the Globally Harmonised System of Classification and Labelling of Chemicals (GHS) Work Health and Safety (WHS) Regulations are the basis for hazardous chemicals regulations in Commonwealth, State and Territory jurisdictions in Australia. Under the model WHS Regulations, manufacturers and importers of substances, mixtures and articles supplied for use in workplaces are required to determine whether they are hazardous to health and safety before supply. The model WHS Regulations mandate that the hazards of a chemical as determined by the Globally Harmonised System of Classification and Labelling of Chemicals (GHS) must be included in safety data sheets and on labels. There are transitional arrangements in place for moving to the GHS-based system.The GHS Hazardous Chemical Information List contains chemicals classified by an authoritative source (such as the European Commission or NICNAS) in accordance with the Globally Harmonized System of Classification and Labelling of Chemicals (the GHS). This list contains the vast majority of chemicals currently in HSIS. This list and its detail are regularly updated by Work Safe Australia. The model Work Health and Safety (WHS) Regulations require chemicals to be classified in accordance with the Globally Harmonised System of Classification and Labelling of Chemicals (GHS). However transitional arrangements allow use of classification information in HSIS derived from the Approved Criteria until the 31 December 2016.
  • toxin chemical structure pubchem
  • FORMULA: CoO4S
  • DATA SOURCES: DATA SOURCES: T3DB | PubChem | NTP | OEHHA | EAFUS | EPA USA - Pesticide Inerts | Safe Work Australia - Hazardous Substances Information System (HSIS)
  • LAST UPDATE: 21/04/2015

  Health Associations

Mostly focused on Health Implications of Long Term Exposure to this substance

  • SYMPTOMS: Cobalt inhalation can cause asthma-like breathing problems. Skin contact is known to result in contact dermatitis, which is characterized by irritation and rashes. Ingesting large amounts of cobalt may cause nausea and vomiting. (L2090)
  • POSSIBLE HEALTH CONSEQUENCES: Exposure to high amount of cobalt can cause heart, lung, kidney, and liver damage. Skin contact is known to result in contact dermatitis. Cobalt may also have mutagenic and carcinogenic effects. (L29, L30) | Cobalt is absorbed though the lungs, gastrointestinal tract, and skin. Since it is a component of the vitamin B12 (cyanocobalamin), it is distributed to most tissues of the body. It is transported in the blood, often bound to albumin, with the highest levels being found in the liver and kidney. Cobalt is excreted mainly in the urine and faeces. (L29)
  • ACTION OF TOXIN: Cobalt is believed to exhibit its toxicity through a oxidant-based and free radical-based processes. It produces oxygen radicals and may be oxidized to ionic cobalt, causing increased lipid peroxidation, DNA damage, and inducing certain enzymes that lead to cell apoptosis. Cobalt has also been shown to block inorganic calcium channels, possibly impairing neurotransmission. Cobalt can also chelate lipoic acids, impairing oxidation of pyruvate or fatty acids. In addition, cobalt may inhibit DNA repair by interacting with zinc finger DNA repair proteins, and has also been shown to inhibit heme synthesis and glucose metabolism. Cobalt may activate specific helper T-lymphocyte cells and interact directly with immunologic proteins, such as antibodies (IgA and IgE) or Fc receptors, resulting in immunosensitization. (L29) | Cobalt inhibits heme synthesis by preventing synthesis of 5-aminolaevulinate via inhibition of 5-aminolaevulinate synthase. (L22)
  • TOXIN SITES OF ACTION IN CELL: "Cell surface", "Cytoplasm", "Extracellular", "Lysosome", "Mitochondrion", "Ribosome"
  • Additional Exposure Routes: Cobalt(II) sulfate is used in pigments for glass and porcelain, as well as in storage batteries and electroplating baths, sympathetic inks, and as an additive to soils and animal feeds. (L36)

  Search our Toxin Profiles

Loading

  Exposure Routes

These are the Exposure Routes we have so far for this substance. There are almost certainly more. We update this section regularly. The number of chemicals with 2 or more nastiness attributes in an exposure route is shown in orange. They grey badge shows the total amount of chemicals within the exposure route.


  Stay Informed

Chemicals released in consumer products and the environment are constantly changing. Regulations change. Exposure Routes change. People speak up and nasties are removed while often others are introduced.

By signing up you will periodically receive updates of potentially life changing information. Both for yourself and your family.

We take security and privacy very seriously and you can unsubscribe at any time.


cats at toxno

"Yeh. We were surprised too"



Your Feedback makes Toxno better for everyone